Hawick’s Rosie Swailes boxing clever at age of 12

Budding Borders boxer Rosie Swailes is already punching above her weight at the age of 12 and her coaches are hopeful she’ll go on to be an even bigger hit.

By Craig Goldthorp
Friday, 18th February 2022, 11:24 am
Updated Monday, 21st February 2022, 1:37 pm
Hawick boxer Rosie Swailes with the gold medal she won at Boxing Scotland's latest national novice championships in North Lanarkshire (Picture by Bill McBurnie)
Hawick boxer Rosie Swailes with the gold medal she won at Boxing Scotland's latest national novice championships in North Lanarkshire (Picture by Bill McBurnie)

In only her second fight, following a points win in Hamilton in November, the Hawick youngster triumphed on points over Mia Pearson in the 12-year-old girls’ 56kg class, over three 90-second rounds, at the latest Boxing Scotland novice championships, held at Motherwell’s Ravenscraig Sports Facility, bringing home a gold medal.

“Rosie did fabulously,” Corey Hunter, one of her three coaches at Hawick Boxing Club, told the Southern Reporter.

“Her variety of punches and movement were excellent. She was also making the other lassie miss.

Hawick boxer Rosie Swailes with Dylan Greig, one of her trainers (Photo: Bill McBurnie)

“Rosie’s tough as nails as well. Nothing fazes her.

“There is a lot to work on but she’s improving every week in the gym.

“I believe that one day Rosie, whose hero is late former world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, wants to be a world champion, and I wouldn’t put anything past her. She’s really determined.

“She’s been doing running on her own, running with a coach and she’s never missed a session in months at the gym.

Rosie Swailes with Corey Hunter, another of her three coaches (Photo: Bill McBurnie)

“She has been training three times a week on a Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday.

Hawick High School pupil Rosie, a member of the club for five years, will next be in the ring on Friday, March 4, and she’ll be up against Pearson again.

That three-round fight will take place in her opponent’s home village of Cambusnethan in North Lanarkshire.

“Rosie is right up there with the best I’ve coached at the club,” Hunter, 28, added.

“Her grit, determination and that ability to handle pressure set her apart.

“She never backs down from anybody.”

Rosie is also coached by Andy MacFarlane and Dylan Greig, and they too have high hopes that she has a bright future in the ring.

She took up boxing after going along to the gym with elder brother Mikey, 14, and finding she really enjoyed it.

“My brother had done it and I just started and I really liked it,” said Rosie.

“I love everything about it – the training, the preparation, the fights.”

The youngster is being encouraged in one of her chosen sports, along with rugby and hockey, by her family but only after rejecting suggestions that she take up a leisure activity less likely to result in being punched.

“I wanted her to go to dancing but Rosie had other ideas,” mum Shirley told us.