Duke spends a couple of days Roman around the Borders

The Duke of Gloucester paid a visit to the Borders last Thursday, to officially open the refurbished Trimontium Museum in Melrose, of which he is patron.

By Kevin Janiak
Wednesday, 27th April 2022, 10:01 am
Updated Wednesday, 27th April 2022, 10:01 am
Bryce MacDougall and Matthew Nesbit from Lauder Primary School the Duke of Gloucester to plant the final tree in the town’s new Platinum Jubilee Wood, watched by classmates. Photo: Phil Wilkinson.
Bryce MacDougall and Matthew Nesbit from Lauder Primary School the Duke of Gloucester to plant the final tree in the town’s new Platinum Jubilee Wood, watched by classmates. Photo: Phil Wilkinson.

The following day, he went on to plant the final tree in a new community woodland in Lauder that forms part of the Queen’s Green Canopy initiative.

The duke was joined by invited guests and supporters of this latest chapter in the Trimontium story to unveil a plaque marking the occasion.

It was a proper Roman day in Melrose, with the Antonine Guard marching around the town and the Time Bandits living history group regaling crowds with stories of the former Roman from which the new museum takes its name, and there were plenty of family activities led by volunteers of the Trimontium Trust.

The Duke of Gloucester in the Trimontium Museum with heritage officer Rob Longworth.

The museum is now open daily for the spring and summer with an online booking system at www.trimontium.co.uk.

The Queen’s Green Canopy is a unique tree-planting project that celebrates the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee by inviting people from across the UK to “plant a tree for the jubilee”.

On behalf of the local community, Borders environmental charity, Tweed Forum applied for and was granted 420 Queen’s Green Canopy trees, which have been planted on Lauder Common in a new Platinum Jubilee Wood.

Watched by supporters, the duke planted the final tree – a rowan – during his visit, with assistance from two children from Lauder Primary School.

The Antonine Guard march through Melrose last Thursday.

The 420 trees comprise a mix of native broadleaf trees which will improve the area’s biodiversity, capture carbon dioxide to help tackle climate change, and aid natural flood management, in addition to adding to the area’s natural beauty. They form part of a larger 22-hectare area of new planting on Lauder Common by Tweed Forum that will provide multiple ecological benefits.

Luke Comins, director of Tweed Forum, said; “We are delighted that His Royal Highness agreed to complete this special area of Queen’s Green Canopy planting. These trees will greatly enhance the natural environment on Lauder Common and will be enjoyed by the community for generations to come.”