Borders cancer waiting times better than national average

Waiting times for cancer treatment in the Scottish Borders are better than the national average.

One hundred per cent of patients in the region diagnosed with cancer received their treatment within the Scottish Government’s target of 31 days, according to statistics from Public Health Scotland for the period January 1 to March 31 this year. The national average was 96 per cent.

In addition, almost 97 per cent of patients in the region given an urgent suspicion of a cancer referral had received their first treatment within the Scottish Government’s 62-day target, well above the Scottish average of 77 per cent.

NHS Borders was also the only health trust in Scotland to meet the 62-day standard.

Sarah Horan, director of Nursing, Midwifery & Allied Professionals at NHS Borders.

A NHS Borders spokesperson said: “Being diagnosed with cancer can be upsetting and difficult for patients and their families to cope with.

“It is important to us that lengthy waits for diagnosis or treatment do not add to the anxiety that patients can feel during this uncertain time.”

Sarah Horan, the director of Nursing, Midwifery & Allied Professionals at NHS Borders, said: “We always strive to deliver the best possible care and see our patients as quickly as we can.

“We have prioritised patients with cancer, or those suspected of having cancer, throughout the pandemic. I am proud that this commitment is clearly shown in these latest figures. The achievement has been possible thanks to the incredible hard work and dedication of our staff.”“The earlier cancer is found, the easier it is to treat. So, if you are concerned or worried, please seek professional help by contacting your GP.”