Archers all of a quiver in Selkirk

The parade heads down the Green on the way to the Haining.
The parade heads down the Green on the way to the Haining.

The queen’s bodyguard in Scotland tested their nerves and their eye for a bullseye on a dreich Saturday afternoon.

Members of the Royal Company of Archers travelled down from their Edinburgh base to the Borders in order to take part in the historic competition for the Selkirk silver arrow.

Salute

Salute

The group marched from the Victoria Halls in the town’s Scott’s Place to the Haining’s long field for the shoot, in which members took it in turns to send their arrows into the air to a small target boss 180 yards away.

Alan Simpson was the man who did enough to hang his arms on the historic trophy, made from silver plate in 1660 by local captain James Fairbairn.

He was presented with the arrow by Scottish Borders Council convener David Parker.

Adair Anderson, a member of the royal company who lives in Selkirk, is a former winner of the arrow, and he said: “The archers were impressed by the welcome given by Scottish Borders Council, and it was a real pleasure to march from the hall to the Haining and back behind the silver band.

Barbara Bradshaw, Viv Ross and Lynne Robertson were on hand at the refresments tent.

Barbara Bradshaw, Viv Ross and Lynne Robertson were on hand at the refresments tent.

“Pity about the weather (and that I did not win).”

The party then marched back into town and enjoyed a mess dinner in the evening at Bowhill, at the invitation of the 11th Duke of Buccleuch, Richard Scott, captain general of the royal company.

Adair Anderson shows the good form he displays for the Royal Company as well as Ettrick Forest Archers.

Adair Anderson shows the good form he displays for the Royal Company as well as Ettrick Forest Archers.

Council convenor David Parker hands over the arrow to winner Alan Simpson.

Council convenor David Parker hands over the arrow to winner Alan Simpson.