Earlston group gets to grips with cutting-edge technology

Earlston Paths Group has secured �1,476 from Paths for All's community grant scheme to buy grass-cutting equipment.'Machinery purchased several years ago and currently in use was no longer able to cope with the demands of maintaining the group's path network.'Two brush-cutters were purchased from Earlston company Border Chainsaw & Lawnmower Services.
Earlston Paths Group has secured �1,476 from Paths for All's community grant scheme to buy grass-cutting equipment.'Machinery purchased several years ago and currently in use was no longer able to cope with the demands of maintaining the group's path network.'Two brush-cutters were purchased from Earlston company Border Chainsaw & Lawnmower Services.

Earlston Paths Group has secured £1,476 from Paths for All’s community grant scheme to buy grass-cutting equipment.

Machinery purchased several years ago and currently in use was no longer able to cope with the demands of maintaining the group’s path network.

Two brush-cutters have been purchased from Earlston company Border Chainsaw & Lawnmower Services.

Group secretary Ian Gibb commented: “Although our older machines were still serviceable and had been regularly maintained by Border Chainsaw, they were just no longer up to the job.

“The new equipment will make the annual task of grass cutting easier on our volunteers and ensure that footpaths are kept open and easily accessed.

“We know that the good standards of path maintenance we try to sustain are appreciated by local people and visitors to our area, and also encourage people out into the countryside with a positive impact on their fitness levels – even if they don’t always associate the benefits of walking on their health.”

The old equipment has been passed on to another group in the west of Scotland to help them look after their paths.

Graeme Cowe, of Border Chainsaw, said: “The Paths Group volunteers do a tremendous job looking after walks in this area and spend a great deal of time ensuring that the footpaths are open and accessible, and don’t become overgrown.”