Warrior and Afghan sunset a winning mix

Pictured:Private Ross Cunningham from 1SCOTS cleaning his personal weapon at FOB Shawqat after a patrol to an ANA checkpoint.''Delta Company The 1st Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland (1SCOTS), based at Forward Operating Base Shawqat are part of the Brigade Advisory Group (BAG) for Op HERRICK 17.The ��Jocks�" as they are affectionately known are there to Mentor and Advise the Afghan National Army (ANA) in conducting operations within Helmand Province.

Pictured:Private Ross Cunningham from 1SCOTS cleaning his personal weapon at FOB Shawqat after a patrol to an ANA checkpoint.''Delta Company The 1st Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland (1SCOTS), based at Forward Operating Base Shawqat are part of the Brigade Advisory Group (BAG) for Op HERRICK 17.The ��Jocks�" as they are affectionately known are there to Mentor and Advise the Afghan National Army (ANA) in conducting operations within Helmand Province.

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A Jedburgh soldier took his camera into the firing line and his shots have made him the army’s top photographer of the year.

Corporal Jamie Peters’ six images scooped the professional portfolio award and a picture of troops operating at sunset was judged to be the best professional operational image.

Pictured: Sappers from 21 Engineer Regiment working as the sun sets, to de-construct a Hesco Bastion building in Patrol Base Nahidullah. The base which was home to Burma Company 1 LANCS was completely stripped down and the land handed back to the farmer.''The LANCS were the first of the 500 troops to leave Afghanistan after the Secretary of State announced they would not complete the full six month tour.''''Photo credit to read: Cpl Jamie Peters RLC

Pictured: Sappers from 21 Engineer Regiment working as the sun sets, to de-construct a Hesco Bastion building in Patrol Base Nahidullah. The base which was home to Burma Company 1 LANCS was completely stripped down and the land handed back to the farmer.''The LANCS were the first of the 500 troops to leave Afghanistan after the Secretary of State announced they would not complete the full six month tour.''''Photo credit to read: Cpl Jamie Peters RLC

But it was his stunning capture of a tattooed soldier from the Royal Scots Borders cleaning his equipment that was judged the best photograph taken by any army soldier – whether a professional or amateur cameraman.

The former Jedburgh Grammar pupil took the photographs while serving with the Royal Logistic Corps during a six-month tour of war-torn Afghanistan.

Corporal Peters , 34, commented: “Being on the combat camera team, I was able to see so much of the work that British troops do in Afghanistan.

“Everywhere we went there was a story to tell – from the experiences of the private soldier up to the HQ level of planning and executing the missions.

Jamie Peters - winner of the Army's photographic competition - tracking wildlife at home in the Borders IN 2004

Jamie Peters - winner of the Army's photographic competition - tracking wildlife at home in the Borders IN 2004

“Our tour was all about transition and redeployment. We covered a large number of base closures and handovers to the Afghan National Security Forces, as well as partnered operations with them.”

Jamie joined the Corps of Royal Engineers as a fitter aged 20, after four years in a local kilt-making mill. He was deployed to Afghanistan, Northern Ireland and Belize. He completed a military photographic course at RAF Cosford and became an official army photographer in February 2011.

His dad John is a professional photographer as well as being a director of Jedburgh -based toolmakers, Starrets.

He told TheSouthern: “When Jamie was a lad we covered many miles exploring the border countryside. Our regular haunts included Davie’s Pond, the Boog, Hartrigge House and Timpendean Wood.

I was extremely pleased and relieved when Jamie said he was applying for a photography course while serving in the Royal Engineers. Afghanistan is a dangerous place for all the serving troops but deep down I was hoping there would be less risk for Jamie working as a battalion photographer.

“I’m so proud of Jamie and his achievements. He’s worked very hard at his photography, both in the army and in his spare time where his real passion is photographing wildlife and nature.

“His portfolio includes superb photographs of birds and wildlife, and like me, he has developed a passion for studying and photographing badgers.

“Jamie watched his first badger surface from its sett on Edgerston estate. To win three awards in his first attempt at the army photographic competition is an outstanding achievement.”