Stained glass window tribute to wool trade

Artist Vivian Haig sits at the newly installed stained glass window which was designed and made by Vivian for St Andrews Church, Innerleithen.
Artist Vivian Haig sits at the newly installed stained glass window which was designed and made by Vivian for St Andrews Church, Innerleithen.
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A stained glass window has been created as a lasting reminder of an industry that brought more than 300 years’

prosperity to the Borders,

Entitled A View of the Wool Trade in the Scottish Borders since 1650, the window was designed and produced in the Bemersyde workshop of artist Vivienne Haig, and installed in St Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Innerleithen.

It was commissioned by Jeremy Ballantyne several years ago after he decided the industry which had done so much for the Borders and, specifically, for Walkerburn, Innerleithen and Peebles, should be permanently marked.

The new window, which consists of a number of coloured scenes depicting elements of the wool trade, will be consecrated in a service led by the Bishop of Edinburgh, the Right Reverend Dr John Armes, on Saturday morning.

Mr Ballantyne’s family started the Ballantyne of Walkerburn textile mill in the mid-19th century, bringing workers from Galashiels and Innerleithen.

Ms Haig says she is very pleased with the way the window has turned out, as there was a long complex process to ensure it is shown off to its best during different light conditions.

“The window is always different, depending on what time of the day or season you view it,” she explained this week.

“It’s never the same. There’s a lot happening in the window, which comprises different scenes from the woollen industry over the centuries.”

Mr Ballantyne’s wife, Sarah Fraser-Ballantyne said her husband is delighted with the window: “He thinks it is wonderful – it really is a work of art.”

And Ms Haig, who has designed windows for churches throughout the UK, paid tribute to Mr Ballantyne and local mills.

“I received a lot of support from firms like Lochcarron, and Mr Ballantyne has been a wonderful client and is a great patron of the arts.”