Selkirk eyesore site goes back on the market

The site of of the former St Mary's Church has gone up for sale.
The site of of the former St Mary's Church has gone up for sale.

The long-running saga over the fate of the former site of St Mary’s Church on Ettrick Terrace could finally be set for a conclusion.

The eyesore area, which has lain as wasteland since the demolition of the church there in 2004, is back on the market.

The site of of the former St Mary's Church, Selkirk.

The site of of the former St Mary's Church, Selkirk.

Walkerburn-based development company Candleberry, who gained permission to develop the land in 2006 but didn’t continue with the works, has decided to sell the site.

The site has always been earmarked for housing, is identified for redevelopment in the local development plan and has lapsed planning consent for 21 flats.

And now Edinburgh-based estate agents Cushman and Wakefield have listed the sale online and placed a large for sale sign on the land. 
Their advert states: “Traditional buildings built of sandstone contribute to the character of Selkirk – one of the oldest settlements in the Scottish Borders.

“The site comprises a brownfield site of approximately 0.28 acres. Previously the site of a church, this land has been cleared in preparation for potential development. The site is regular in shape, and slopes to the west, opening sweeping vistas of the countryside.”

The firm also outlines the town’s amenities such as schools and supermarkets and highlights its locality to the Borders Railway.

Delays over the site’s development have been angering Souters for years, especially during remembrance services and common ridings. Selkirk Ex-Servicemen’s Association recently undertook a restoration project to transform the front of the site into a space in remembrance of Souters who served in World War One.

The group installed new screening, repaired the front walls and added decorative planting and a memorial bench, all of which was unveiled in time for Selkirk Common Riding.

The work was carried out with the uncertain future of the entire site in mind and most parts can be redistributed around the town.