Projects allow residents to tap in to new supplies

Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister
Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister
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RESIDENTS across the Borders have benefited from a huge investment by Scottish Water, which has been welcomed by the Scottish Government.

The recently completed multi-million pound projects have seen new pipes installed as well as connections with upgraded treatment plants and sources created.

A £1.5million scheme has provided villagers in Heriot with access to high quality water from Scottish Water’s treatment works at Rosebery, thanks to around five miles of new pipes.

A similar investment has resulted in the completion of a five-mile ‘gravity main’ running from Selkirk to Yarrowford.

This means water in the area no longer needs to be supplied from an old borehole, but from the treatment works at Howden, which itself has already benefited from a recent £10million investment.

Scottish Water’s regional community manager, Bill Elliot, said: “The creation of new pipes and mains will ensure more of our customers in the Borders have access to high-quality drinking water, which has been treated to the highest standard in refurbished treatment works.

“Scottish Water continually invests in enhancing Scotland’s water infrastructure and completion of this latest project is a real boost for the Borders.”

Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: “Our vision of Scotland as a hydro nation will play a key part in our plans to develop a low carbon economy, boost growth and create jobs.

“This major infrastructure investment by Scottish Water in the Borders is good news for domestic and business customers in the area.

“It illustrates how Scottish Water is delivering essential services to our communities across Scotland.”

Customers in the Bonchester area have also been connected to a new supply, thanks to a new gravity main from the Roberton water treatment works and a new pumping station. This work has been carried out at a cost of around £3million.

Completion of this project means Scottish Water will be able to provide water for new customers in the area, as well as providing existing customers with water which has been subject to the very best treatment processes at Rosebery and Roberton, where a £14.7million refurbishment was completed in 2011.

In addition to improving the water supply to residents, the projects have also enhanced the security of supply and reduced energy consumption.