Moving on towards statehood

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Have your say

I suppose it was inevitable that with the spectacular and overwhelming SNP victory at May’s Scottish Parliament elections, the Unionist dinosaurs would come crawling out of the woodwork.

Much of this stems from a realisation, I guess, that an independent Scotland is now a near inevitability, but, as with the diehards who oppose the Borders railway, some folk cannot see when the world has moved on.

Robin Cross’s strange outburst (letters, June 23) misses almost every point.

An independent Scotland – free to spend its own tax revenues how it pleased and no longer dragged down by the cost of England’s absurd and unwinnable wars, the continuing theft of Scottish oil revenues and the short-termism of the English Treasury – would readily be able to provide all the benefits that Mr Cross seems to think are some sort of impossible utopia.

Any difference in the per head “cost” of the Scottish population is more than compensated by higher tax per head that each Scot generates. The argument about “subsidy” is, in short, entirely fallacious and one that, happily, more and more folk are seeing through.

Even more entertaining was the letter you carried a few weeks back suggesting the Borders might “go it alone” when independence comes because most folk here do not want political self-determination. While this would create a fascinating web of new national frontiers, I think a far more likely outcome of independence is that Scotland will claim back Berwick (illegally occupied by the English for centuries) and straighten out and simplify the border.

The greatest danger to independence is, of course, the propaganda inherent in the sort of reactionary, Anglocentric, Unionist drivel that has been reflected in some recent letters in your newspaper.

May I suggest that your readers are given a break from this dross and that the writers are given time to reflect on the fact that Europe is increasingly a patchwork of small nations, many recently born, which have achieved independence with one referendum and are extremely content to have done so.

Richard West

Inch Park

Kelso