DCSIMG

Royal Scots Borderers make most of booze-free Helmand Hogmanay

Pictured:The troops playing reel the bucket, when the piper plays they have to try to swing the other players into the buckets until there is only two left. The winner is decided by an arm wrestle contest.
Photo credit to read Cpl Jamie Peters RLC

British forces serving in southern Afghanistan have been marking New Years Eve at military bases across Helmand Province this evening.

The British troops found time between their duties to acknowledge what has been a productive 2012, which has seen the first 500 servicemen sent home from Afghanistan in recent weeks as they begin to complete their mission to hand over responsibility for security to Afghan forces.

Photo credit to read: Cpl Jamie Peters RLC

Pictured:The troops playing reel the bucket, when the piper plays they have to try to swing the other players into the buckets until there is only two left. The winner is decided by an arm wrestle contest. Photo credit to read Cpl Jamie Peters RLC British forces serving in southern Afghanistan have been marking New Years Eve at military bases across Helmand Province this evening. The British troops found time between their duties to acknowledge what has been a productive 2012, which has seen the first 500 servicemen sent home from Afghanistan in recent weeks as they begin to complete their mission to hand over responsibility for security to Afghan forces. Photo credit to read: Cpl Jamie Peters RLC

ROYAL Scots Borderers serving in southern Afghanistan celebrated Hogmanay as best they could at Camp Bastion – with alcohol-free beer, “bucket reeling” and an early bed.

Corporal James Peters, of the Royal Logistic Corps, who took these photographs at the 28,000-strong British military base, described how the troops of 1Scots, an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, brought a wee bit of home to Lashkar Gah.

“They played games like Irn-Bru bong,” he said, “where two cans of pop are poured into a funnel with a long straw, and are gulped down as fast as possible without spilling any. In addition to the games they had a buffet, and lots of cans of fizzy pop – Irn-Bru, Mirinda (Fanta) and alcohol-free Becks.”

Cpl Peters explained another game called “bucket reeling”: “Twelve troops link arms in a circle and try to manoeuvre each other into a bucket in the centre of the circle. If they touched the bucket or broke the circle they were out. Once it was down to the last two they arm-wrestled to see who was the winner.

“The piper playing started each round. They also competed to hammer a three-inch nail into a piece of wood in the shortest number of hits possible.

“At five minutes to midnight, the guys all got together and had a countdown which was followed by Auld Lang Syne on the pipes and a quick dance and sing along. After which the troops all went to bed as it was business as usual for them the next day.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page