DCSIMG

Projects sought for offenders to undertake work on

Kenny MacAskill MSP visits Selkirk Football Club to see work that was carried out by offenders on community payback orders. Seen here with the club vice-chairman Ross Anderson.

Kenny MacAskill MSP visits Selkirk Football Club to see work that was carried out by offenders on community payback orders. Seen here with the club vice-chairman Ross Anderson.

THE council’s criminal justice team is keen to hear from individuals and organisations which have a project that could benefit from offenders carrying out unpaid work as part of a court-imposed community payback order.

Last year offenders created new terracing at Selkirk FC’s Yarrow Park ground, put down 130 tonnes of gravel to level the car park, improved the look of the facility and built fencing.

Selkirk FC vice-chairman Ross Anderson said: “We would not have been able to pay for all the work undertaken were it not for the scheme.”

Unpaid work mostly comprises of projects which would not otherwise be undertaken, and those which would not normally be completed by paid employment.

Councillor Donald Moffat, executive member for community safety, said: “Community Payback can provide offenders with routine and structure to their lives and can give them experience of following instructions and working as part of a team.

“This can help change their behaviour and at the same time pay back a debt to the community in a highly visible way.”

A total of 21,242 hours of unpaid work was ordered by Borders courts in 2012/13.

 

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