Lawyers’ legal aid has a charitable twist

Susie Elliot MBE accepts a cheque for �2500 from Ron Hastings. Logan Bell on top of the horse at the Riding for the Disabled Association's facility near Ancrum.
Susie Elliot MBE accepts a cheque for �2500 from Ron Hastings. Logan Bell on top of the horse at the Riding for the Disabled Association's facility near Ancrum.
0
Have your say

A local law firm’s generosity saw a cheque for £2,500 handed over to the Borders group of the Riding for the Disabled Association.

Ron Hastings, of Hastings & Co. Solicitors, which has offices in Kelso and Selkirk, was at the group’s indoor riding arena near Ancrum earlier this week to present the cheque to the charity’s RDA board member Susie Elliot MBE.

Susie Elliot MBE accepts a cheque for �2500 from Ron Hastings. Logan Bell on top of the horse at the Riding for the Disabled Association's facility near Ancrum.

Susie Elliot MBE accepts a cheque for �2500 from Ron Hastings. Logan Bell on top of the horse at the Riding for the Disabled Association's facility near Ancrum.

“We chose the charity as a good local cause in the central Borders, providing an essential service by improving the quality of life for young and old, allowing access to quality local facilities for disabled riders,” Mr Hastings told The Southern.

“The group has a real challenge arranging transport for diverse groups, including many from schools throughout the Borders, and it is a credit to the enthusiasm and dedication of the volunteers and organisers that they make this happen.

“No service is cost-free and with the upkeep of the facilities and the horses, there is a constant need to raise funds and to enable this essential service to continue.

“As a firm we felt this would be a good way to make a positive contribution and we are grateful to the many clients who helped raise this worthwhile sum, knowing that this will make a real difference to those who need it most.”

The money was raised through Hastings & Co. donating its fees for work drawing up wills for clients from last summer onwards. 
Susie told The Southern the RDA and its horses and ponies give children and adults the opportunity to achieve therapeutic social and life skills and, through sport, helps make dreams come true.

“For both children and adults who may have low muscle tone, are in a wheelchair, have no confidence or self-esteem, the movement of the horse and the connection with the animal improves health and wellbeing,” she explained.

The Borders group, which has been running for 46 years, is operated by 60 volunteers and around 80 riders and vaulters, and has its own horses and ponies.