FRAMED IN TIME

With the 30th anniversary of the Falklands conflict making headlines, this week's Framed in Time ' thanks to Judy Olsen's book, Old Jedburgh ' also features British troops being readied for action.'In August 1914, Army Reserve men left the town by train, sent off by Provost Boyd, Bailie William Oliver and Councillor J. C. Clark. Three cheers were given for the king and the national anthem sung. Four more young men ' Robert Haig, James Millar, David Rutherford and George Nelson ' left three days later.'Opened in 1856, the Jedburgh line brought in goods for shops and shoppers from surrounding communities. The station, situated three-quarters of a mile from the town centre, was closed to passenger traffic after storms in 1948 and to freight in 1964.
With the 30th anniversary of the Falklands conflict making headlines, this week's Framed in Time ' thanks to Judy Olsen's book, Old Jedburgh ' also features British troops being readied for action.'In August 1914, Army Reserve men left the town by train, sent off by Provost Boyd, Bailie William Oliver and Councillor J. C. Clark. Three cheers were given for the king and the national anthem sung. Four more young men ' Robert Haig, James Millar, David Rutherford and George Nelson ' left three days later.'Opened in 1856, the Jedburgh line brought in goods for shops and shoppers from surrounding communities. The station, situated three-quarters of a mile from the town centre, was closed to passenger traffic after storms in 1948 and to freight in 1964.

With the 30th anniversary of the Falklands conflict making headlines, this week’s Framed in Time – thanks to Judy Olsen’s book, Old Jedburgh – also features British troops being readied for action.

In August 1914, Army Reserve men left the town by train, sent off by Provost Boyd, Bailie William Oliver and Councillor J. C. Clark. Three cheers were given for the king and the national anthem sung. Four more young men – Robert Haig, James Millar, David Rutherford and George Nelson – left three days later.

Opened in 1856, the Jedburgh line brought in goods for shops and shoppers from surrounding communities. The station, situated three-quarters of a mile from the town centre, was closed to passenger traffic after storms in 1948 and to freight in 1964.