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Stewart on the route to success with software

Stewart Anderson, formerly of Gordon, received his NUS Environmental Improvement Award from Jamie Agombar, ethical and environmental manager for the National Union of Students.

Stewart Anderson, formerly of Gordon, received his NUS Environmental Improvement Award from Jamie Agombar, ethical and environmental manager for the National Union of Students.

A former Earlston High School pupil has won an award for a computer programme which calculates the most sustainable route to meetings.

Stewart Anderson, who was brought up in Gordon, scooped the National Union of Students Environmental Improvement Award.

The 27-year-old works as an IT manager for Edinburgh Research and Innovation, the commercial arm of the University of Edinburgh.

Stewart developed software for the email programme Microsoft Outlook which automatically works out the best way to get to meetings the user has in their online calendar.

The Go Green software prioritises walking, cycling and public transport and previously landed Stewart an award within the University of Edinburgh.

Stewart said: “I am overwhelmed to have been presented with the NUS Environmental Improvement Award for the Go Green, Outlook plugin.

“At the University of Edinburgh staff and students make thousands of trips every day to appointments.

“We believe there is a desire to do this in a sustainable way, however currently there are no easy solutions available for finding the most sustainable route.

“I developed the Go Green plugin which allows users to find the greenest route to appointments scheduled in their Outlook calendar in order to both promote sustainability and aid in carbon reduction.”

He added: “I am currently undergoing further development of Go Green in preparation for the University of Edinburgh release, which will also integrate with the University Shuttle Bus times.

“I am looking forward to seeing my work in action and hope that it will help the University of Edinburgh leave a lighter footprint.”

Stewart said he envisioned the software being an integral part of a computer programme like Microsoft Outlook in the future and is planning to develop a general release version.

This would enable it to become part of wider software programmes and could work anywhere in the world.

 

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