Burgh pupils learn to be instinctively wild

From left: pupils Reegan Stisi, Kai Allan & Christopher Hay collect their certificates
From left: pupils Reegan Stisi, Kai Allan & Christopher Hay collect their certificates
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When pupils from Burgh Primary School in Galashiels went down to the woods over several days, they were sure to win a big prize.

It was no surprise – as the hard work and enthusiasm they had put in ensured their school was the only primary in the Borders to be awarded the Access to Education grant from Education Scotland.

The grant specifically focuses on using innovative techniques to enhance the curriculum, one such technique being Outdoor Learning.

This technique at the Burgh school has been delivered through the John Muir Award, using a ‘Forest School’ approach.

Helping them on the woodland paths of nearby Gala Policies was Pete Carthy, founding director of Instinctively Wild.

Mr Carthy said: “A woodland is a multi-sensory learning environment, which lends itself very well to active learning across the curriculum.

“Children don’t realise they are learning, as they are having such fun.”

The project ran from February until the end of September – culminating with them receiving the John Muir Award on October 9.

Martin Wilson, depute headteacher at Burgh Primary, said: “To be the only primary school selected for this grant demonstrates our commitment in the school to teaching and learning, and using innovative ways to deliver a rich, in depth and high quality curriculum.

“We are really proud of the children who have taken part and achieved the award.

“Some staff are being trained in John Muir Award delivery by Instinctively Wild so we can continue the project next year”.