Borderers play their part in stitching together the nation’s history

Ettrick and Yarrow Stitchers, from left, Sandra Moffat, Alison Blackadder, Ann Hardie nd Margaret Robinson with their contribution the the Great Tapestry of Scotland
Ettrick and Yarrow Stitchers, from left, Sandra Moffat, Alison Blackadder, Ann Hardie nd Margaret Robinson with their contribution the the Great Tapestry of Scotland

Ettrick and Yarrow Stitchers Sandra Moffat, Alison Blackadder, Ann Hardie and Margaret Robinson with their contribution to the Great Tapestry of Scotland – a unique project to stitch the entire story of the country from pre-history to modern times.

It is the brainchild of one of Scotland’s best- known writers, Alexander McCall Smith, together with Borders historian Alistair Moffat and artist Andrew Crummy (not to mention stitchers from all over the country).

The Borders stitchers’ efforts – one of 150 panels which make up the tapestry – depicts Montrose’s defeat at the Battle of Philiphaugh and has taken almost a year to create.

It was on display at last Saturday’s Ettrickbridge Church spring fair, which is expected to raise about £500.

Sandra produced a potted history about the tapestry for those who attended to read.

The tapestry is one of the biggest community arts projects to take place in Scotland. When all the panels have been completed, it will be put together and launched at the Scottish Parliament in September.

The project has involved more than 300 stitchers and over 30 miles of woollen yarn.