Banner of creative faces smiles on BGH chaplaincy

Handing over of banner to the borders general hospital chaplaincy centre by earlston high school pupils. From left, Matthew Jamieson, Fiona Williams, Roa Johnstone, BGH project officer, Rachel Bacon, (bgh general manager), Rosie Brosman, Roan Torrance and Mathilde Vermey.

Handing over of banner to the borders general hospital chaplaincy centre by earlston high school pupils. From left, Matthew Jamieson, Fiona Williams, Roa Johnstone, BGH project officer, Rachel Bacon, (bgh general manager), Rosie Brosman, Roan Torrance and Mathilde Vermey.

0
Have your say

PUPILS at Earlston High have transformed pieces of fabric gifted by a local mill into a stunning piece of artwork.

And on Tuesday, they presented their colourful banner to Rachel Bacon, general manager of the Borders General Hospital, where it will take pride of place in the chaplaincy.

The mixed-media piece was crafted by pupils of two first-year classes during the 2009/10 session, under the encouraging tutelage of teacher Carol Ann Burnside.

“Their task was to draw images of themselves which were photocopied and used as a paper pattern: the kind used in dressmaking,” explained Carol. “We had been given a large amount of quality material by Lochcarron of Scotland in Selkirk and, once all the cutting out and pinning had been done by the children, I used an electric sewing machine to bring it all together.”

Carol said that to meet the aims of the Curriculum for Excellence, such project work should ideally be seen in a public place.

“We actually made two banners: one for Lochcarron’s visitor centre to mark our gratitude for the fabrics, while we all agreed the other should go to the BGH in the hope of bringing some pleasure to those viewing it.”

On Monday, five of the talented students, now in second year, visited the chaplaincy to hand over the banner to Rachel.

“Clearly a huge amount of work has gone into this really interesting piece of artwork,” said Rachel.

““We chose the chaplaincy to display it so that visitors can take time to admire it and read about how it was created. Also, we reckoned it would lose some of its impact in the main hospital where, for infection control and fire safety reasons, it would have had to be placed in a protected case.

“It looks much better hanging freely from its pole.”