Athlete moves her Rotary audience

Galashiels Rotarians were inspired by Borders wheelchair athlete Samantha Kinghorn's story, sense of humour and resilience when she spoke to the club and guests.Pictured with her are Inner Wheel president Vi Romanis, left, and Lynda Stoddart, Rotary club vice-president.
Galashiels Rotarians were inspired by Borders wheelchair athlete Samantha Kinghorn's story, sense of humour and resilience when she spoke to the club and guests.Pictured with her are Inner Wheel president Vi Romanis, left, and Lynda Stoddart, Rotary club vice-president.

Galashiels Rotarians were inspired by Borders wheelchair athlete Samantha Kinghorn’s story, sense of humour and resilience when she spoke to the club and guests.

She was paralysed from the waist down in an accident in 2010 when she only 14 and there were fears she might not walk again.

However, following surgery and an intensive rehabilitation programme, Samantha was chosen to take part in the Spinal Unit Games at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, being particularly taken by wheelchair racing.

With local support, she was able to buy a chair and went to the London wheelchair mini marathon, which is more than three miles, finishing second. She became under-18 world number one, represented Scotland at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games and made the GB team for the European Games.

Samantha is a full-time athlete funded by the GB team and has a new chair, costing £6,500, which she designed herself. It was partly funded by Galashiels Inner Wheel. She trains daily at Tweedbank and on local roads, and hopes to be selected for the next Olympic Games.

Pictured with her are Inner Wheel president Vi Romanis, left, and Lynda Stoddart, Rotary club vice-president.