Out and about in the Borders this Easter

CAP-CITY,BILL HENRY, DREW (WORDS) 15/07/01, MOUNTAIN  BIKING  IN  THE  PEEBLES  AREA  AT  GLENTRESS  COUNTRY  PARK. HERE  WE  SEE  TRAIL  BIKER  TRAIL DESIGNER PETER LAING ENJOYING THE VIEW FROM CARESMAN HILL(550 METRES).
CAP-CITY,BILL HENRY, DREW (WORDS) 15/07/01, MOUNTAIN BIKING IN THE PEEBLES AREA AT GLENTRESS COUNTRY PARK. HERE WE SEE TRAIL BIKER TRAIL DESIGNER PETER LAING ENJOYING THE VIEW FROM CARESMAN HILL(550 METRES).
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If you are looking for something to do in the Borders this Easter, you will not be short of suggestions. Because the region has plenty to offer, whether on two feet, four feet, two wheels, four wheels, and even, if you bring your binoculars, with four eyes.

Whether you want to walk, run, ride, fish, rally, swim, cycle, sail, golf, abseil, kayak and climb, these are the adventures awaiting you in the contrasting local landscapes of hill, loch, moor, forest, meadow, river and coast.

2008 Scottish Borders Walking Festival ' walkers at Caddonhead on a walk in the Moorfoot Hills. There is time to chat to fellow walkers while walking in the late summer days of the festival. 'Mike Baker/Southern Reporter

2008 Scottish Borders Walking Festival ' walkers at Caddonhead on a walk in the Moorfoot Hills. There is time to chat to fellow walkers while walking in the late summer days of the festival. 'Mike Baker/Southern Reporter

Walkers can hike the Eildon, Cheviot or Lammermuir hills, and rock-climb the crags of Ruberslaw, yet also explore the beaches and coves of east Berwickshire.

Road cyclists can discover the ranging countryside at their own pace on the quiet lanes of the Tweed Cycleway, while mountain bikers tear up the world-class trails of 7stanes Glentress Forest in the Tweed Valley.

Off-roaders, rally drivers and even nostalgic holiday-makers in love with VW camper vans can find the freedom to roam the land’s varied terrains, as motorcylists ride the 3,000km of roads that made local sons of speed Jimmie Guthrie and Steve Hislop champions. Horse-riders can canter and gallop through the woodland trails of Scotland’s Horse Country, and join the marches of history behind a charging standard bearer in the Border towns’ common ridings.

Golfers can play more than 20 courses on the best-selling Freedom of the Fairways pass: from the championship 18 holes at Roxburghe and Cardrona, to “Britain’s most extraordinary golf hole” over the crashing waves on Eyemouth golf course.

Bowhill House and Country Estate adventure playground.

Bowhill House and Country Estate adventure playground.

Archers have the opportunity to rove the forest to simulate hunting for prey, while clay-shooters can test their aim on the rapid-fire, realistic flushes. In gentle waters, fishermen can cast a fly in the hope of hooking the wild trout, grayling and salmon teeming in the Tweed, “the queen of salmon rivers”, and its tributaries.

If history is your interest, there are a number of excellent historic properties to whet your appetite, including Abbotsford, Traquair and Bowhill.

And for those youngsters looking for something a little extra, a number of venues run special activities to suit, including Harestanes, Bowhill and Glentress, with their activity centres.

And at the end of the day, exhausted, you can relax with delicious food and drink in a local eatery before you start something completely different the next morning.